科號Course Number:09120ANTH665700 學分Credit:3 人數限制Size of Limit:
中文名稱Course Title:語言人類學導論
英文名稱Course English Title:Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology
任課教師Instructor:蔣 斌、魏捷茲
上課時間Time:R6R7R8
上課教室Room:人社C304

課程大綱:
一、課程說明(Course Description)
LINGUISTIC ANTHROPOLOGY
Institute of Anthropology
National Tsing Hua University
Spring Semester 2003
Instructors: Bien Chiang and James Wilkerson
Time: Thursdays, 2:00-5:00
Place: Room C304, College of Humanities and Social Science
Course Description: This course introduces the core terms, concepts, and assumptions of anthropological
research on language, examples of its application in ethnographic description, analysis, and comparison,
and the wider derivations from and implications for
cultural anthropology and socio-cultural thought. Special attention is paid to bridging between macro-
Discourses (for example Foucault) and micro-discourse of language practice. Special attention is
furthermore paid to special concerns and opportunities in ethnographic description, analysis, and comparison
in ethnography in Taiwan in particular and Asia in general. An advanced course that assumes a solid
background in general anthropology, at least a rudimentary familiarity with general linguistics, and
strong English language reading skills, this course is not designed to meet the needs of the institute
requirement in linguistic anthropology for doctoral students. It is rather intended for advanced students
with a special interest in incorporating ethnography of language in their proposals, research, and writing.
Course Requirements. Regular course attendance (a maximum of two unexcused absences), timely completion of
all course readings and active class participation, a 2,500-3,000 character critique each week on one or more
primary or secondary readings (beginning the second class meeting and ending the fifteenth class meeting,
with the option of two either dropping the three lowest scores or skipping three critiques), and a 8,000 to
10,000 character term paper applying course content to an ethnographic description, analysis, and comparison.
It is expected that the critiques will be selected based on and reworked to form the basis of the review of
the literature section of the term paper. A 500 character abstract of the term paper is due before the eighth
class meeting; each critique is due before the beginning of that week’s class meeting; and, the term paper
is due before the beginning of the last class meeting.
Grading. The minimum requirements for a passing grade is to come to class, participate, and complete and turn
in all written work on in time. All written work is evaluated and scored as if it were being submitted for
publication. Academic writing assumes as one of its features the assumption that the written results will be
prepared for or at least at a standard suitable for submission for publication. Course grading is thus set
to standards of quality suitable for submission for review for publication. A score of ninety or above indicates
that the work would be accepted for publication without further revision. A score of between eight-five and
eight-nine indicates that the work would be accepted for publication with revision. A score of between eighty
and eighty-four indicates that the work has the potential for submission for publication after further revision.
A score of between seventy and seventy-nine indicates basic problems in writing that preclude submission for
publication until those problems are confronted and overcome. A score below seventy indicates either an unwillingness
or inability to write at a level consistent with that expected of graduate students.
Note. Liu Tzu-k’ai (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign) and Shih Ch’ung-yu (Northwestern University)
kindly provided sample syllabi by Brenda Farnell, Peggy J. Miller, and Stanton Wortham, which were consulted
in the preparation of this syllabus. Since this is the first time that we are offering this course, everything
about the present draft of this syllabus is open to revision on the basis of student feedback.

二、指定用書(Text Books)




三、參考書籍(References)

PRIMARY READINGS

FIRST WEEK: GETTING OUR FOOTINGS STRAIGHT
Gil, David. 2001. “Escaping Eurocentrism: Fieldwork as a Process of Unlearning.” Linguistic Fieldwork.
Pp 102-132. Paul Newman and Martha Ratliff, eds. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

SECOND WEEK: STRUCTURE
Foley, W. 1997. Anthropological Linguistics: An Introduction. Malden: Blackwell. (Read Chapter 1)
Duranti, A. 1997. Linguistic Anthropology. New York: Cambridge University Press. (Read Chapter 6)

THIRD WEEK: SPEECH ACT THEORY AND THE ETHNOGRAPHY OF SPEAKING
Austin, J. L. 1997 [1962] How to Do Things With Words. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.
(Read Lectures 1-2, 5, 7-8, 11-12)
Hymes, Dell. 1962. “The Ethnography of Speaking.” In Language, Culture, and Society: A Book of Readings.
Pp 248-282. Ben G. Blount, ed. Second edition. Prospect heights, Illinois: Waveland Press.
Rosaldo, M. 1982. “The Things We Do with Words.” Language in Society 11: 203- 237.

FOURTH WEEK: PERFORMANCE AND VERBAL ART
Basso, K. 1979. Portraits of the Whiteman. Pp 37-64. New York: Cambridge University.
Champion, T. 1997. “Tell me Somethin’ Good.” Linguistics and Education 9: 251-286.
Gee, J. 1989. “Two Styles of Narrative Construction and their Linguistic and Educational Implications.
” Discourse Processes 12: 287-307.

FIFTH WEEK: SEMIOTICS AND INDEXICALITY
Weinreich, U. 1968. “Semantics and Semiotics.” International Encyclopedia of Social Science 14: 164-169.
Sebeok, T. 1990. “Indexicality.” The American Journal of Semiotics 7(4): 7-28.
Silverstein, M. 1976. “Shifters, Linguistic Categories, and Cultural Description.” In Meaning in Anthropology.
Keith Basso and Henry Selby, eds. Albuquerque, New Mexico: University of New Mexico Press.

SIXTH WEEK: CONTEXTUALIZATION
Hanks, William F. 1996. “Introduction.” In Language and Communicative Practices. Boulder, Colorado: Westview.
Gumperz, J. 1982. “Contextualization Conventions.” In Discourse Strategies. Pp 130-152. New York: Cambridge
University Press.
Silverstein, M. 1992. “The Indeterminacy of Contextualization: When is Enough Enough?” In The Contextualization
of Language. P. Auer and A. DiLuzio, eds. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

SEVENTH WEEK: METALANGUAGE
Lucy, J. 1993. “Reflexive Language and the Human Disciplines.” Reflexive Language. John Lucy, ed. New York:
Cambridge University Press.
Mertz, E. 1993. “Learning What to Ask.” In Reflexive Language. John Lucy, ed. New York: Cambridge University.
Bateson, G. 1972 [1954]. “A Theory of Play and Fantasy.” In Steps Towards an Ecology of Mind. New York:
Ballentine Books.
EIGHTH WEEK: ENTEXTUALIZATION AND RITUAL
Silverstein, M. and G. Urban. 1996. “The Natural History of Discourse." In Natural Histories of Discourse.
M. Silverstein and G. Urban, eds. Chicago: University of Chicago.
Parmentier, R. 1997. “The Pragmatic Semiotics of Cultures.” Semiotica 116: 1-42.

NINETH WEEK: DIALOGICALITY
Bakhtin, M. 1981 [1935]. “Discourse in the Novel.” In The Dialogic Imagination. Pp 259-366. Austin: University
of Texas.
Rampton, B. 1995. “Language Crossing and the Problematisation of Ethnicity and Socialization.” Pragmatics 5: 485-513.
TENTH WEEK: PRONOUNS AND DEIXIS
Beneviste, E. 1971. “The Nature of Pronouns.” In Problems in General Linguistics. Pp 217-222: Miami,
Florida: University of Miami Press.
Beneviste, E. 1971. “Subjectivity in Language.” In Problems in General Linguistics. Pp 223-230. University
of Miami Press.
Wortham, S. 1996. “Mapping Participant Deictics: A Technique for Discovering Speakers’ Footing.” Journal of
Pragmatics 25: 331-48.
Keogh, J. 1997. “Pronouns as Positioning Practices in Home-School Communications.” Linguistics and Education 9: 1-23.

ELEVENTH WEEK: LINGUISTIC IDEOLOGY
Woolard, K. 1998. “Introduction.” In Language Ideologies. B. Schieffelin, K. Woolard and P. Kroskrity, eds. NY:
Oxford University.
Mertz, E. 1998. “Language Ideology and Praxis in US Law School Classrooms.” In Language Ideologies. B. Schieffelin,
K. Woolard and P. Kroskrity, eds. New York: Oxford University.
Bucholtz, M. 1999. “You da man: Narrating the Racial Other in the Production of White Masculinity. Journal of
Sociolinguistics 3: 443-460.

TWELFTH WEEK: LANGUAGE SOCIALIZATION
Ochs, E. and B. Schieffelin. 1984. “Language Acquisition and Socialization.” In Culture Theory. R. Shweder and
R. LeVine, eds. New York: Cambridge University Press.
Goodwin, M. 1990. “Tactical Uses of Stories.” In Conflict Talk. A. Grimshaw, ed. New York: Cambridge University.
Miller, P. 1986. “Teasing As Language Socialization and Verbal Play in a White Working-Class Community.”
In B. Schieffelin and E. Ochs, eds. Language Socialization Across Cultures. New York: Cambridge University.

THIRTEENTH WEEK: SOCIAL REPRODUCTION
Bourdieu, P. 1977. “The Economics of Linguistic Exchanges.” Social Science Information 16 (6): 645-668.
Mehan, H. 1996. “The Construction of an LD Student: A Case Study in the Politics of Representation.” In Natural
Histories of Discourse. Michael Silverstein and Greg Urban, eds. Chicago: University of Chicago.
Heath, S. 1996. “What No Bedtime Story Means: Narrative Skills at Home and School.” In The Matrix of Language:
Contemporary Linguistic Anthropology. Donald Brenneis and Ronald K.S. Macaulay, eds. Boulder, Colorado: Westview.

FOURTEENTH WEEK: SOCIAL IDENTITY
Goodwin, M. 1999. “Constructing Opposition within Girls’ Games.” In Reinventing Identities. M. Bucholtz, A.
Liang and L. Sutton, eds. New York: Oxford University Press.
Urciouli, B. 1996. Exposing Prejudice. Boulder: Westview. (Read Chapters 2 and 4)
Mendoza-Denton, N. 1996. “Muy Macha.” Ethnos 61: 47-63.

FIFTEENTH WEEK: LITERACY
Collins, J. 1996. “Socialization to Text: Structure and Contradiction in Schooled Literacy.” In Natural Histories
of Discourse. Michael Silverstein and Greg Urban, eds. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
Lien, Chinfa. 1995. “Language Adaptation in Taoist Liturgical Texts.” In Ritual and Scriptyure in Chinese Popular
Religion: Five Studies. Pp 219-246. David Johnson, ed. Berkeley, California: IEAS Publications.
Fenollosa, Ernest. 1983 [1908]. “From ‘The Chinese Written Character as a Medium for Poetry.’” In Symposium of
the Whole: A Range of Discourse Toward an Ethnopoetics. Pp 19-28. Jerome Rotherberg and Diane Rothenberg, eds. and
com. Berkeley, California: University of California Press.
Orellana, M. 1999. “Good Guys and ‘Bad’ Girls.” In Reinventing Identities. M. Bucholtz, A. Liang and L. Sutton,
eds. New York: Oxford University Press.

SECONDARY READINGS

FIRST WEEK:
Greene, Graham. 1960. A Burnt-Out Case. London: Penguin Books.

SECOND WEEK: STRUCTURE
Saussure, F. de. 1966 [1915]. Course in General Linguistics. New York: McGraw Hill Book Company.
(Read pp 65-70 [Part One, Chapter 1, “Nature of the Linguistic Sign”] and pp 101-127 [Part Two,
Chapters 1 through 5 “Synchronic Linguistics”])
Jakobson, R. 1971. ‘Boas’ View of Grammatical Meaning.’ Selected Writings of Roman Jakobson. Volume 2.
Pp 489-96. The Hague: Mouton.

THIRD WEEK: SPEECH ACT THEORY AND THE ETHNOGRAPHY OF SPEAKING
Hymes, Dell. 1972. “On Communicative Competence.” Pp 53-73. In Linguistic Anthropology: A Reader. A. Duranti,
ed. Oxford: Blackwell.
Gumperz, John. 1968. “The Speech Community.” In Linguistic Anthropology: A Reader. Pp 43-52. A Duranti, ed.
Oxford: Blackwell.
Basso, Keith H. 1990. “‘Speaking With Names’: Language and Landscape Among the Western Apache.” In Western
Apache Language and Culture: Essays in Linguistic Anthropology. Pp 138-173. Tucson, Arizona: The University of
Arizona Press.

FOURTH WEEK: PERFORMANCE AND VERBAL ART
Gee, J. 1986. Units in the Production of Discourse. Discourse Processes 9: 391-422.
Hymes, D. 1996. Ethnopoetics and Sociolinguistics. In Ethnography, Linguistics, Narrative Inequality. D. Hymes,
ed. Bristol, Pennsylvania: Taylor and Francis.

FIFTH WEEK: SEMIOTICS AND INDEXICALITY
Peirce, C. 1932. ‘Division of Signs’ And ‘The Icon, Index, and Symbol.’ In Collected Papers of Charles Sanders
Peirce. Volume 2. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.

SIXTH WEEK: CONTEXTUALIZATION
Zentella, A. 1998. “Multiple Codes, Multiple Identities.” In Kids Talk. S. Hoyle and C. Adger, eds. New York:
Oxford University.
Goffman, E. 1964. “The Neglected Situation.” American Anthropologist 66: 133-6.
Gumperz, J. 1986. “Interactional Sociolinguistics in the Study of Schooling.” In The Social Construction of
Literacy. Jenny Cook-Gumperz, ed. New York: Cambridge University Press.

SEVENTH WEEK: METALANGUAGE
Urban, G. 1996. Metaphysical Community. Austin, Texas: University of Texas. (Read Chapter 1)
Silverstein, M. 1993. “Metapragmatic Discourse and Metapragmatic Function.” In Reflexive Language. J. Lucy, ed.
New York: Cambridge University.
Wortham, S. and M. Locher. 1999. “Embedded Metapragmatics and Lying Politicians.” Language and Communication 19:
109-125.

EIGHTH WEEK: ENTEXTUALIZATION AND RITUAL
Mertz, E. 1996. “Recontextualization as Socialization”. In Natural Histories of Discourse. Michael Silverstein
and Greg Urban, eds. Chicago, Illinois: University of Chicago.
McDermott, R. and H. Tylor. 1995. On the Necessity of Collusion in Conversation. In The Dialogic Emergence of
Culture. D. Tedlock and B. Mannheim, eds. Urbana, Illinois: University of Illinois.
Silverstein, M. 1985. “On the Pragmatic ‘Poetry’ of Prose.” In Meaning, Form and Use in Context. D. Schiffrin,
ed. Washington, D.C.: Georgetown University.

NINETH WEEK: DIALOGICALITY
Gergen, K. 1989. “Warranting Voice and the Elaboration of the Self.” In Texts of Identity. Pp 70-81. J. Shotter
and K. Gergen, eds. London: Sage.
Gilligan, C. 1986. “Remapping the Moral Domain.” In Reconstructing Individualism. Heller, Sosna and Wellbery,
eds. Stanford, California: Stanford University Press.
Taylor, C. 1989. “The Dialogical Self.” In Sources of the Self. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press.
Hermans, H. 1993. “Voicing the Self.” In The Dialogical Self: Meaning As Movement. H. Hermans and H. Kempen.
Academic Press.

TENTH WEEK: PRONOUNS AND DEIXIS
Hanks, W. 1992. ‘The Indexical Ground of Deictic Reference.’ In Rethinking Context. Alessandro Duranti and M.
Goodwin, eds. New York: Cambridge University Press.
Friedrich, P. 1986. Social Context and Semantic Feature: The Russian Pronominal Usage. In Directions in
Sociolinguistics. D. Hymes and J. Gumperz, eds. Oxford: Blackwell.

ELEVENTH WEEK: LINGUISTIC IDEOLOGY
Gal, S. 1998. Multiplicity and Contention among Language Ideologies. In Language Ideologies. B. Schieffelin,
K. Woolard and P. Kroskrity, eds. New York: Oxford University.
O’Connor, K. (in press). Communicative Practice and Identity in Geographically Distributed Service Learning.
Linguistics and Education.
Silverstein, M. 1985. Language and the Culture of Gender. In Semiotic Mediation. E. Mertz and R. Parmentier, eds.
Orlando: Academic Press.

TWELFTH WEEK: LANGUAGE SOCIALIZATION
Duranti, A. and E. Ochs. 1986. “Literacy Instruction in a Samoan Village.” In The Acquisition of Literacy.
B. Schieffelin and P. Gilmore, eds. Norwood, New Jersey: Ablex.
Rymes, B. 1997. “Second Language Socialization: A New Approach to Second Language Acquisition Research.” Journal
of Intensive English Studies 11: 143- 155.

THIRTEENTH WEEK: SOCIAL REPRODUCTION
Eckert, P. 1989. Jocks and Burnouts. NY: Teachers College Press. (Read Chapters 1 and 4)
Eckert, P. and S. McConnell-Ginet. 1992. “Think Practically and Look Locally.” Annual Review of Anthropology 21:
461-490.

FOURTEENTH WEEK: SOCIAL IDENTITY
Heller, M. 1995. “Code-switching and the Politics of Language.” In One Speaker Two Languages. L. Milroy and P.
Muyksen, eds. NY: Cambridge University Press.
Silverstein, M. 1998. “Contemporary Transformations of Local Linguistic Communities.” Annual Review of Anthropology
27: 401-426.
Rampton, B. 1999. “Deutsch in Inner London and the Animation of an Instructed Foreign Language.” Journal of
Sociolinguistics 3: 480-504.

FIFTEENTH WEEK: LITERACY
Gee, J. 1990. Social Linguistics and Literacies. NY: Falmer. (Read Chapters 3 and 6)
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